Current Research Projects

Exploring Self-Directed Learning Readiness in Cohort and Course-Based Programs 

Research Team: Amanda R. Dumoulin, Brandon J. Justus, and Jonathan B. K. Lau 

There are two phases to the study. One phase is to provide further validity evidence for a measure of self-directed learning readiness by correlating it with other relevant measures. The second phase of this study is to compare student readiness among a selection of cohort-based (i.e., trades and nursing) and course-based (i.e., arts and science) programs.  

Due to COVID-19, we are postponing collecting data in cohort-based and science programs. We are currently writing the manuscript for phase 1 of this study.

This project was accepted for poster presentation at the 2021 Canadian Psychological Association Annual National Convention.

Narratives of Empowerment through Attaining a Black Belt in Mixed Martial Arts  

Research Team: Amanda R. Dumoulin 

The purpose of this study is to qualitatively explore the experiences of individuals who have attained a black belt in mixed martial arts.  

It you have a black belt in a discipline of martial arts and would like to participate in this study, contact Dr. Rusticus at shayna.rusticus@kpu.ca 

Validation of the Teamwork Expectations and Attitudes Measure 

Research team: Brittney Stobbe, Jonathan B. K. Lau, and Brandon J. Justus 

Abstract

Teamwork is essential in any group projects and being able to identify attitudes and expectations could support students, teachers, and instructors with learning. To help identify attitudes and expectations in groups, our study developed a scaled called the Teamwork Expectations and Attitudes Measure (TEAM). First, two pilot studies were conducted to develop and refine the items. Starting with 75-items, the TEAM scale was completed into a 14-item unidimensional scale. Second, the pilot studies were followed up with a validation study which confirmed the unidimensional structure of the scale and provided evidence of convergent, discriminant, and criterion validity. In the end, the purpose of the developing the TEAM scale was to create something that could assist instructors and students on the perception of teamwork in class, which in turn could shred knowledge about the class’ overall view about group work. Therefore, with the significant findings from this study, the TEAM scale can be useful tool in undergraduate environments that need extra support in examining teamwork within classes.  

We are currently writing the manuscript for this project.

This project was accepted for poster presentation at the 2021 Annual Meeting of the National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME).

Teaching Perspectives Inventory (TPI)

Research team: Amanda R. Dumoulin and Brandon J. Justus

Abstract

The Teaching Perspectives Inventory (TPI) assesses teacher’s beliefs, intentions, and actions as they relate to the five teaching perspectives of transmission, apprenticeship, nurturing, developmental, and social reform. In this study we explored whether there was a relationship between teachers’ dominant teaching perspectives and both level of teaching (elementary to graduate) and teaching experience (novice to very experienced) in a sample of 54,176 respondents from Canada and the United States. A chi-square test of independence revealed a statistically significant and medium-sized relationship between teaching perspective and level of teaching, with a nurturing perspective being more common among elementary and secondary teachers and an apprenticeship perspective being more common among undergraduate and graduate teachers. A second chi-square test of independent revealed a statistically significant but small relationship between teaching perspective and teaching experience. All experience levels had the same rank ordering of perspectives: nurturing, apprenticeship, developmental, transmission, then social reform. Understanding patterns and diversity in teaching perspectives can help institutions foster faculty development to provide a more personalized approach to supporting their educators, allowing for the benefits to be felt by the students. 

We are currently writing the manuscript for this project.

This project was accepted for poster presentation at the 2021 Canadian Psychological Association Annual National Convention.

Employable-Skills Self-Efficacy Survey: A Validation Study

Research team: Amanda R. Dumoulin

Abstract

The Employable Skills Self-Efficacy Survey (ESSES; Ciarocco & Strohmetz, 2018) is a scale that measures the self-efficacy of undergraduate psychology students. This measure is intended to assess an important collection of constructs and has many potential benefits, including assisting institutions in ensuring their students accomplish the goals laid out by the American Psychological Association (2013) for undergraduate psychology students. The purpose of this study was to provide additional validity evidence for the ESSES by looking at its internal structure, reliability, and convergent and discriminant validity. As identified through confirmatory factor analysis, the ESSES does not have an eleven-factor structure, but ten of the eleven subscales were found to be unidimensional. However, only three of the unidimensional subscales had acceptable reliability. There was evidence of convergent validity, but limited evidence of discriminant validity. Revisions are necessary before this scale should be used to measure the employable skills self-efficacy of undergraduate psychology students.  

We are currently writing the manuscript for this project.

This project was accepted for poster presentation at the 2021 Annual Meeting of the National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME).

Adapting the Employable Skills Self-Efficacy Survey

Research team: Amanda R. Dumoulin

Based on the findings of the Employable Skills Self-Efficacy Survey (ESSES) Validation Study, we are revising the ESSES. Items have been added and revised based on their factor loadings, subscale reliability, and theoretical relevance.

We are currently collecting data for pilot for this project. If you would like to participate, access the survey through SONA.